‘Joseph and his Amazing Black and White Pictures’ by David Henderson

Stratherrick Hall, 30th September 2014 at 7.30pm

David’s talk and slide show was preceded by a brief AGM of the Heritage Group.  Apologies were given and the minutes of the 2013 AGM approved, along with Frank’s 2013/14 Accounts.   Alan had printed his Chair’s Report to save time.   Unfortunately we have lost our Secretary, Carol Jones, and so are looking for a replacement.   Other new recruits to our small committee are always welcome, and could help boost the activities of the Heritage Group.

David Henderson is an Invernessian, a retired economist and ex-Highland Councillor.  A couple of years ago he gave us a most interesting and entertaining illustrated talk on the history of Highland cattle droving.   This time round, he was talking about the Joseph Cook collection of photographs of Inverness, fascinating black-and-white images from the late 19th and early 20th centuries.   Joseph Cook was not a photographer himself, but was a collector of interesting historical photographs of Inverness and its surroundings, taken by a number of photographers whose identities have now largely been lost.

David gave us an extensive show of photographs from the collection, giving a fascinating view of Inverness in bygone times, including perhaps the only surviving photograph of the old stone arched bridge which preceded the fondly remembered suspension bridge, which itself was well covered by a number of views.   The Castle and its Jail, Castle Tolmie, thatched cottages in streets such as King Street, leather tanning by the river, the Town Steeple and Town House, the Cathedral and Eden Court (the Bishop’s Palace), and Dalneigh when is was a farm outside Inverness’s built-up area were among the many subjects covered by David’s slide show.   He added colour to the monochrome views by adding descriptive comments and interesting anecdotes about many of them.

Alan thanked David for his talk and show, and there were many questions and additional comments from the audience.   The evening finished with tea, coffee and biscuits – thanks to Elspeth, Margaret and Morgan for preparing these refreshments.

Watch out for our next event, planned for spring 2015.

Burnett/Stoddart

I congratulate you on your website & the wonderful historic work you are undertaking.  I have been to the area on 2 occasions: in 1995 and again last August.

A couple of locals seemed to think that at one time there was a baker named Burnett in the area.

On this visit I specifically looked for where the farming properties may have been where my 4Xg grandfather Alexander Burnett and his family farmed:  Ballangan (farm area at time of death),‘Ballichirnock’ (1861 census- 40 acres),and Culduthel (where he died).  From my search I’m inclined to think that the first 2 places were near Fargaig, and Culduthel further north towards Inverness.  Also on the Linton gravestone Leadolurs.

All these 3 families originated in the Borders: Ettrick, Yarrow, Selkirk, and Ashkirk areas. By 1830 Alexander Burnett (& Helen Stoddart & young family) was a shepherd in the Loch Broom area. Continue reading